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on refills ♪ . adam: welcome back to "money". the energy information administration recently made a prediction that grabbed headlines around the world. the united states it said will become the world's top oil producer by the end of this decade, 2020 but the eia is taking serious heat for that bold call. the association for the study of peak oil and gas says the eia must revise its prediction, claiming it creates a misleading picture of u.s. energy supplies. did the eia complete completely overshoot or will it prove spot on? we have a editor of the 7s report. thanks for showing up. the eia said the united states is on track to do this but where are they getting it wrong? are they confusing u.s. energy overall with just oil or are they making some other flaw in their logic? >> hi, adam. that is exactly right. so it is feasible by the end of this decade that the united states could be the world's largest energy producer but not the world's largest oil producer and you can see that just through the numbers. saudi arabia produces about 10 million barrels per day. we produce about
of a glorious past. and some parts of the city bustle with holiday energy. but not far away: closed-up storefronts. and, further below the surface, this: a health clinic set up by the greek branch of the international aid group, doctors of the world to serve the country's newly poor. dr. nikitis kanakis is its director. >> brown: kanakis group, in fact, had to cut back some of its work in africa because of the needs at home. here in perama, unemployment tops 50% as the shrinking economy has crippled much of the local shipping industry. at the same time, the deeply indebted greek government has made dramatic budget cuts, including to health benefits. the combination has left many here without access to private or public care. and that's meant a stunning rise in disease and mortality rates. >> brown: economists, of course, speak of a different kind of necessary medicine: the kind a deeply indebted nation must take. the price for living and consuming well beyond its means for far too long. >> the medicine is necessary. it was, though, delivered very abruptly. >> brown: as a government
they do? pump it up. >> i have been saying that all morning. >> yeah. >> high energy, guys. high energy. >> it's the way you said it. you are supposed to do the fist pumping and shouting -- >> i don't think the fist pump is cool any more. >> me and cool, we don't spend too much time together, so you can do the fist pump in my presence. today no wind, no clouds. just all sunshine. and yes, indeed, it's after the winter solstice, and that means the days are getting longer, yes, we have six more seconds of daylight than yesterday and tomorrow nine more seconds than today, and the days will get longer all the way up through the spring equinox in march, and then we will had 22 more minutes of daylight a day opposed to the seconds. and it's chilly on the way outside to get your bags now. temperatures, 20s and 30s across the area. we will see a quick rise with all the sunshine out there. all in beautiful charles county, maryland, temperatures in the 40s by noontime today pushing 50 degrees this afternoon with 100% sunshine in la plata. so a chilly day, and great weather for football. no doubt
of school dhaka would cost energy. not money to the teachers. i don't need incentives for your kids performing better i mean for trying harder. >> this raises an interesting question. there are some school districts that are using cash incentives for teachers based on whether the kids showing in pronounced and riss tests. they are not being taught how to think. they are being taught how to take a test. >> what do you mean about disrespectful to the teacher? spec to say to get your kids to perform better we will give you a little extra. >> no, no. my god. [laughter] >> no, i actually think that in the days when we had expectations of learning we were taught to think and the test existed to see how well we thought. >> right here. >> i think the end justifies the small amount of money. >> in the end what is the end exactly? it is to get them to read more books. to educate and get the american level of education not to other countries to educate them. >> fair is someone sitting next to you that disagrees triet [laughter] >> you destroy their love of learning into the value of reading a
, the rule of law for all, the right of peaceful nuclear energy for all. >> but do you want, do you want, mr. -- >> allow me, sir. allow me. >> the question wasn't any of that. >> but i will get to that answer. don't be in such a hurry. >> should israel be wiped off the face of the map? is that your desire? >> translator: if a group comes and occupies the united states of america, destroys homes while women and children are in those homes, incarcerate the youth of america, impose five different wars on many neighbors and always threaten others, what would you do? what would you say? would you help it? would you help that entity or what you help the people of the united states? so when we say -- when we say to be wiped, we say for occupation to be wiped off from this world, for war seeking to be wiped off and eradicated, the killing of women and children to be eradicated and we propose the way, we propose the path. >> what they're really saying is despite the fact we deny the holocaust, threaten israel, demonize the united states and all this stuff, we want you to trust us. in spite of the fa
in the history of science and that means more wacky weather, more moisture, more energy. global warming is a misnomer. it should be called global swing. >> which means the world doesn't end tomorrow. it's just every little event is worse or inkre meantycrementally worse than before. >> you look at all the glaciers are receding. the ice caps has diminished by 50% just in the last 50 years. an area the size of united states in terms of ice disappeared this year over the polar ice caps. the seasons are changing. summer is longer winter is shorter, tropical diseases are moving north. all the indicators show that the earth is warming up and that's what's driving some of this wacky weather. >> duh that show more or could we snap back? >> get used to it. we could be experiencing more 100-year flooding storms, hurricanes because there's more energy circumstance lating. we could argue how much human activity is driving it but everybody agrees the earth is heating up there's more energy in the system. that means more swing in the weather. >> no matter who's contributing it
for in 2013. harris: there are three you said. what are they? >> housing, energy and huge amount, trillions of dollars sitting on the sidelines by corporate america, waiting to come into the economy once this picture clears up. harris: we're getting housing numbers coming this week already. we're starting to see prices rose a little bit this fall. that is a good sign. we're seeing housing starts have come up as well. so i understand that. energy. >> energy is a game-changer, it really is. we look what is going on around the world. the europeans, far east, they're paying over $17 a btu for natural gas. we get it for $3 in this country. dow chemical just proposed building the largest chemical plant it has in the world here in this country because of the competitive advantage of natural gas. imagine if we could liquify, ship it to europe, ship it to the far east. not only would we have a huge impact on trade balance but actually help the economies out too. game-changer. harris: you mentioned cash on the sidelines. where is that coming from? >> corporate america and consumers, and we saw it thi
even when you're away from home. adjust your thermostat remotely to help save energy and money. turn on the lights, even see that everyone is safe and secure. and with adt, you can rely on our fast response monitoring for 24/7 protection against burglary, fire, and high levels of carbon monoxide. the adt new year's sale. it could help you save something more important than money. call now to save $300 on adt starting at $99 installed plus 15% off accessories. sale ends midnight january 2nd. >> as of today americans can no longer adopt children from russia. putin signed the bill. the move appears to mark a deterioration of releasing between washington and the kremlin. it comes despite the fact more russian orphans have gone to new homes in america than any other country. 60,000 adoptions in the past 20 years. hundreds of thousands of children who need homes have fewer options and dozens whose adoptions were in the process must remain in russia, including some who met and bonded with their perspective new parents. officials in washington calling it a politically motivated decision aime
for that energy. >> thank you, you have a lot of energy, secretary hilda solis, we're glad you came. [applause] c-span3 c-span2 >> by the time i was 9 years old, was handing out leaflets for robert kennedy and then i broke with the democratic party. i went to work for john lindsay who is running for mayor of new york. i went down to the liberal party to work for him i was handed out leaflets on the street corner in new york. some woman thought this was cute, this little boy handing out leaflets and chest and why and i made the case for john lindsay and got an early start on my political consulting career and made the case against his opponent as well. she said that is so cute and she handed me a box of pastry, a white box with string, and it took a back to the liberal party headquarters and we opened it up and there was all these doughnuts and a wad of $10 bills. in one of my early lessons and politics, the district's lawyer grabbed the mom -- grab the money and said you can keep the donuts. [laughter] >> david axelrod to night on his life in politics. at 10:45, growing up in the white house with
right now. not in insignificant number. across the board. financial, energy, there are several energy conservation rules that are at the white house right now. there is also epa rules at the white house. it spans the sector. a lot will depend on how fast these rules come out. it is in a pretty slow pace as of late. liz: we know that the epa has been issuing a lot of rules. will that basically slow the new regulations coming out of the epa or not? >> it does not seem likely. apparently, her deputy is in place to take over the reins. for example, just last friday, they released what is known as rules for boilers and submit kilns. she announced today. according to white house documents, by spring you busy final rules for greenhouse gas regulations for new power plants. liz: how many of these new rules are confirmed by the u.s. congress or are they just coming out of regulatory agencies. is it 50%? >> we have actually looked at that data in terms of what has a judicial deadline. the rules are 10%. now, under dodd-frank, that is expected to come out in january. a lot of these rules, especi
energy but first lauren simonetti on the floor of the new york stock exchange. >> the dow is down 59 points, and the s&p 500. that is why we are not selling of more than we are, this could be the longest losing streak, and three months. and we have been through, congressional negotiations get a deal in the eleventh hour. in terms of stocks, bringing the burger king, costa rica and kuala mola, with a company -- that stock is down 1-3/4%. for the commodities let's go to sandra smith. sandra: a couple days late, the christmas holiday, crude-oil inventories report wednesday, we got it today. a bit of market movers for crude oil and natural gas, the biggest gain in commodity up 1/4%, and this is a combination with the fact the we are kidding cooler than normal temperatures in the northeast where a lot of this is used to heat homes and very bullish for natural gas up 2 of the last three daas, we will see natural gas prices going higher. crude-oil prices with $90 a barrel, holding above that right now, down on the session but we got a bigger than expected build in crude inventories in the l
place. >> dylan has a severe form of a disease that drolz not create enough energy to sustain his body. parts of him are shutting down. but dwrorktz say petesing together legos is a powerful medicine. >> when you're building how does it make you feel? >> it zrakts the pain. >> as legos are being built it seems like he can focus on what he is achieving. >> nearly a dozen specialists are now working to combat his condition. while focusing on that, he is now graduated to projects so complex they're raitd for teenagers and have more than 1300 pieces. >> this just the way he talks about it, he puts himself into one of the places instead of being here it is easy. for me. >> what a great kid. he says his goal is to build a lego city. the hospital staff has been impressed they've created a gallery of the projects and we have a link on abc 7 go check out his work. >> absolutely. and listen to this, remember frisbee golf? it has a new name and lots of places to play it. >> mike shumann >> some of you remember frisbee golf, right? around since 1970s? >> noi, it's called disc golf. there
a month. i am trying to go back to cornell to do sustainable energy. we are in a double down on reaganomics in despite. jimmy carter had great inflation because for five years we were a peaceful country again. then reagan put us back into the largest military buildup in peacetime. i think that's what we ought to do is realize that did not work, just like some of the new deal stuff was not working correctly. what we have to do is c- [indiscernible] i want to thank mr. richard delver of the department of transportation, because unlike michael bloomberg -- host: you have gone a little bit off track, but we appreciate your comments this morning. you can see his picture on your screen. and from the new york times business section -- and from "usa today" -- that the lead this morning in "usa today." coming up, steve forbes will be here in 45 minutes to take your calls regarding issues in washington, including what we just talked about. next is lawrence yun of the national association of realtors to talk about the real estate market and how the fiscal cliff could affect it.
the cold even when you're away from home. adjust your thermostat remotely to help save energy and money. turn on the lights, even see that everyone is safe and secure. and with adt, you can rely on our fast response monitoring for 24/7 protection against burglary, fire, and high levels of carbon monoxide. the adt new year's sale. it could help you save something more important than money. call now to save $300 on adt starting at $99 installed plus 15% off accessories. sale ends midnight january 2nd. ♪ ♪ >> eric: welcome back, everybody. so this is one of our last shows of 2012. it's been a fantastic year. 2013 shaping up to be especially better for "the five." i predicted it. we will be number one. thoughts on the year that was and the year in front of us. >> it has been incredible. 2012 was such a busy an interesting news year. so many stories. outcomes we couldn't have predicted. we covered the election. that was obviously a daily endeavor to get through it. >> eric: that wasn't so much fun. [ laughter ] >> kimberly: watched debates. romney did great on the first debate. we talked
? by the barrelful? the carful? how the bowlful? campbell's soups give you nutrition, energy, and can help you keep a healthy weight. campbell's. it's amazing what soup can do. >>> i have appointed brian schott as the next senator from hawaii. of course senator inouye's views and wishes were considered fully. >>> quite an amazing shocker there, tracy, we thought it was going to be dana. >> well, democracy often treated like a sport, but in the end is a democracy. i give kudos to the governor for following his principles and the wishes of the state. i don't even want to try to dissect if it was a dis on the late heroic senator. >> i think there's a number that matters, 40, the age of brian shatz. this sets him up for decades if he manages to win. the congresswoman i think is in her early 60s. i think that may have been part of the governor's calculation. >> hawaii has lot as much as senator inouye was a hero. i didn't know the whole story until he passed away. it's not your personal property to pass along. >> it's not the kennedys seat, the same thing. >>> shameless plugs. >> sending good w
.s. becoming energy independent on its own. do you really think it will happen? because i still talk to a couple of people in the oim and gas industry that say, you know what? it's a far cry from the reality out there. we're still going to see the middle east being the dominating oil exporter. >>. >> i think in terms of any oil forecast, my experience is i'm lucky if i can forecast the oil price more than six months. so to forecast it eight years out, what's happened also is in terms of supply is that last year another reason why the oil price got held up was that we had problems in the north sea. the only nonopec user who came up with the goods was the u.s. everybody else failed as they always do. >> i was just wondering, christian, what your thoughts are. also, we were looking at the higher oil prices. higher being anything north of 100 at the time saying it's going to slow down a recovery in markets. this time around, now we're using to prices being in the region of 100. but what are your thoughts when you look at oil at the moment? >> well, we've had these two years where in wint
. it impacts those of us concerned about the energy and security of this country because the farm bill contains ways to promote alternate energy sours, ways to create a biofuel industry that is robust and creates consumer choice. for those concerned about exports connected to the agricultural exports, we lose the ability to market exports without a farm bill. if you're concerned about the ability to add adequate nutrition and supporter of farmer's markets and want to see an expansion of that, can't do it because there is no farm bill. if you like the idea of fields expanding habitat opportunities or you like to hunt and you like to fish, your hobby, your vocation, if you will, in that area will also be affected by no farm bill because a lot of the programs are not extended. if you're a farm family, you're going to be impacted. so there is an impact and an effect by not having a farm bill. >> congress has three options before the end of the year to prevent the price spike and everything that comes with it. they could either extend the current bishlg pass a new bill or some kind of provision to k
if it is to prosper. it needs the energies of the creative imagination, as expressed in religion and the arts. it is crucial to the lives of all of our citizens, as it is to all human beings at all times, that they encounter a world that possesses a transcendent medium. the world in which the human experience makes sense. nothing is more dehumanizing, more certain to generate a crisis, then to experience one's life as a meaningless event in a meaningless world. we may be approaching what is unexplored and parallels social territory. -- perilous social territory. europe is experiencing the widespread waning of the religious impulse. it seems that when a majority of people internalize the big bang theory, and ask, with peggy lee, is that all there is? when people decide that the universe is the result of a cosmic sneeze with no transcendent meaning, when they conclude that life should be filled to overflowing with distractions, comforts and entertainments to as which -- assuage the boredom. they might give up the excitements of politics. we know from experience of the bloodsoaked 20th century,
's proliferation-sensitive energy sector which even the united nations acknowledges is providing revenues for iran's nuclear weapons program. kelly: you know, to that end, congress has just approved an amendment to the national defense authorization act which, of course, would then toughen sanctions on iran in some key areas. what impact will that have on iran's nuclear program? >> well, you know, so far sanctions have had no impact. they haven't broken the nuclear will of khamenei, but there's no doubt the iranian regime is hurting. these sanctions are meant to massively intensify the economic pressure in the hope that peaceful economic pressure will change the regime's risk/reward calculus. again, no evidence that it has. we'll see with the next round of negotiations that are supposed to resume in the january. kelly: again, the military option does remain on the table, albeit it's not being discussed right now. >> well, it has to be on the table because the only way you break the nuclear will is if ha manny believes the united states will use military force. if he doesn't believe that, all the s
for the eloquence of the spoken words about the challenges that we face. hopefully we will turn that energy from occurring. i want to commend the president and vice president biden for working on this issue. there are obvious ones like getting assault weapons. and the question is, what will we do? secretary, thank you, and thank the president for supporting us. [applause] i want to recognize the council members that have joined us today. and the council member that within the last 24 hours, the chair of the education committee. both are experienced and are very committed to the district. thank you for being here. to the folks that have joined us, our deputy mayor that has a daunting responsibility of health and human services, and who has enormous experience working with children, especially early childhood. the deputy mayor for education, we appreciate you stepping up. our chair that leaves the child and family services committee. we got a glowing report just the other day with the progress we are making. it wasn't long ago that we had children in foster care in the city. the number is down to
holidays to all of our troops serving overseas. we love you. you are our heros. >> she has a lot of energy. victoria jackson has always had a lot of energy. that is one of her signatures. >> that's a good way to put it. >> it's great to wake up to. >> that's right. [ laughter ] >> we have so much going on on the show this morning. if can you see behind the scenes here. john cooking up great christmas. >> dag gum great foods. coming up in 30 or 40 minutes or so i have got your best gadgets. guys, wait until the last possible minute to buy gifts for their wives and ladies in their life. coming up i will will show you some last minute ones you can go out and pick up this weekend right before christmas. >> high calorie and expensive show coming up before you. just in our newsroom of the president and family landing in honolulu, hawaii could the president's vacation come at a worse time. we are just 10 days away from falling off the fiscal cliff. there is still no deal in sight. >> don't hold your breath, folks. peter doocy joins us live from washington, d.c. with the latest. peter, any deal an
's soups give you nutrition, energy, and can help you keep a healthy weight. campbell's. it's amazing what soup can do. we believe the more you know, the better you trade. so we have ongoing webinars and interactive learning, plus, in-branch seminars at over 500 locations, where our dedicated support teams help you know more so your money can do more. [ rodger ] at scottrade, seven dollar trades are just the start. our teams have the information you want when you need it. it's another reason more investors are saying... [ all ] i'm with scottrade. >>> for me personally, it is important for me to go ahead and affirm that i think same-sex couples should be able to get married. >> 2012 was a pivotal year for president obama and the last campaign of his political career made for plenty of memorable moments. joining me for a look back at the presidential highs and lows of 2012, usa today's david jackson. good afternoon, rather, how are you? >> good afternoon, luke, thanks for having me. >> so what do you say are some of the biggest moments of the year? i would say supporting same-sex marriage w
think about this, right now there's a lot of interest. there's a lot of energy and a lot of political will, but as the new year goes and as things pass and we have to think back to previous shootings, sometimes that wanes. are you concerned at all about this? >> none whatsoever. we have gotten support from all over the world and these women are strong and they are smart and they are going to make change. we are going to represent ourselveses with a calm and intelligent voice and we are going to get change. >> one of the solutions and we were covering this last week, one of the ideas and these are often difficult to talk about. bulletproof backpacks. is it at that level right now? you being a mother must be strange to consider such a situation. >> i can't imagine anything like that happening. if there were anything that were required of my children to wear a bulletproof backpack i think i would leave. i would move to another country. that -- that would rob me of my freedom. >> are you hopeful? do you feel that this is different this time around that something will get done? >> absolute
's point, schwarzkopf was a man of unbelievable intelligence and volcanic energy and -- you know, i think soldiers loved the guy. but in retrospect, in history, what we ought to really recognize is that the combination of general schwartzko schwartzkopf, colin powell, the wonderful first president bush, all three of them were men who understood the limits of military power. and were cautious and actually didn't want to fight unless forced to and they did fight they used overwhelming force. schwartzkopf's contribution -- he was trying -- a lot of brilliant people. so-called jedi knights, bunch of army-navy marine air force young guys who came up with a strategy to not batter directly away at the enemy force. remember that iraqi army. fourth largest army in the world. it had thousands and thousands of tanks and artillery pieces. and if you look at our military history, frequently what we have had, you know, world war ii, the italian theater, korea, korean peninsula, just battering away directly at an enemy. schwarzkopf, when he unveiled that plan, i was a division commander, sitting in a ro
that the department of energy or the department of education and the number of employees they have. we do not need all that. they can cut the number of employees in half and we would have real savings. nobody will address these issues. i'll hang up. guest: when you have a budget in washington, it is hard to cut back politically. if you do, people say you are against the were the goal. this worthy goal, that worthy goal. there was a british historian in the 1950's. after world war i, britain had the largest navy in the world and they reduced the size of the navy. the laid-off sailors and dock workers. the agency running the navy was getting bigger as the navy was getting smaller. he made the discovery -- the size of a bureaucracy has nothing to do with the amount of work the bureaucracy does. it will grow unless it is reined in. the bureaucracy was getting bigger. if you get that kind of bloat, get in trouble and you change or go out of business. ronald reagan said the closest thing to immortality is a government agency. caller: good morning, everybody. do you think capitalism and privatizing is withdr
throughout today and tonight. let's break it down. you see the low sliding off the coast. getting energy if the west. it becomes intense and stays to the south of new england. now with that flow, we're getting the winds coming from the north, picking up the moisture from the atlantic. that's why eastern massachusetts, if you can see the brighter white here, indicates a little bit more intense snowfall. it is still something we're monitoring because the as the low slides east or west, that would impacts how much rain versus how much snow you get in new england. whether you're in new england or not, you'll face some travel troubles today. we have airport delays forecast for the northeast, the mid-atlantic, the midwest. and even down here in the south, we had delays in charlotte this morning. and on the west coast, we could see delays, low clouds and rain even in los angeles. busy travel weekend. lots of weather coast to coast that will impact millions of people. >> no escaping it, huh? >> no. >> thanks. >>> tax hikes, spending cuts, and the u.s. economy caught right in the middle. we can o
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commerce secretary, your energy secretary. so he relied on sort of the people just around him. i think this administration and the president should do a better job of getting his cabinet out there, because, frankly, most americans don't even know who the rest of the cabinet members are. >> finer point on it, roland. do you think the president is sending a message that he won't fight for his nominees? >> well, i think what he's doing is, he's picking and choosing his battles, but he needs to understand, the last four years, republicans fought him on everything. he should send the signal, i'm not going to play the games we played the last four years. i'm going to be very aggressive, and if you want to deny me my choice, then you should vote that person down. he should have put her forward, and look, if he wants former senator chuck hagel, put him forward as well, and tell the senate, i dare you to do it. >> alice, that brings up an interesting point. tom friedman wrote an op-ed in "the new york times" today, defending chuck hagel. i want to read a portion of it. he says, "hagel is out of
. people not wanting to make commitments. and therefore give of their time and their energy to have families in the first place. and then he made reference to this manipulation of nature. but he never mentioned gay marriage. he never mentioned gay people in there. so i think, you know, it is it was certainly one can interpret that was the focus of what he was talking about in that particular paragraph. but i think to characterize the whole message that way is reductive. he was calling all of us to task for various failings, in our personal lives, and i think that the message is that the dialogue -- we have to engage in an ongoing dialogue, even with those who disagree with us. i would include gay people. >> raymond arroyo, thank you for joining us with your take on what we expect to be the content of the homily a little later in th christmas message as well. raymond arroyo is the news director of the eternal world television network. thank you for being with us. we're going to take a short break on cnn. 2012 turned out to be a year full of incredible stories. some sparked internatio
this energy up to the east. you'll be watching for heavy snow in the burlington area. many people might be vacationing and enjoying some skiing at this time in vermont so that's good news. but temperature plummetted in the south. it's only 32 in charlotte and 27 in memphis. so ali, unseasonably cold here in the southeast. this is more like what you'd be experiencing in new york than we would here in atlanta. >> just above freezing in atlanta and in alabama freezing and lower. bonnie, we'll check in with you through the course of the morning. this dangerous storm and it's devastating winds have several states in the south picking up pieces this morning in the cold after getting torn up by tornados. look at this incredible surveillance video from cameras at a walgreens drugstore in mobile, alabama. vehicles getting tossed around like match boxes in the parking lot. >> i've never been in a war zone but i'm sure this is what it's looks like. here's a bunch of tin, a bunch of stuff lifted off the buildings in our parking lot. >> tornados also ripped up parts of pearl river county, mississipp
blank range. >> all the kinetic energy was absorbed with armor. >> reporter: three small holes, the armor is a little stiffer. and the rounds are inside here. >> that's correct. >> reporter: not alone. in boston, bullet-blocker promises your peace of mind is our business. in austin, texas, sales are up 50% at schools and daycare facilities. even the column column ban designer has fashionable resistance for a toddler. you're profitable off terror and horror. >> this is the last thing we wanted to do. we're trying to meet the needs. >> reporter: amendment 2 says's its proprietary material is like a protective blanket. the company says it can be used as a mat in a school, for instance, and in an imagine for protection. at salt lake city's get some guns and ammo owner stuart wallin says protective gear won't stop a killer. only another gun will. >> if you knew every teacher in the school had a gun i think you would think differently about your plan. >> reporter: utah has allowed teachers to carry concealed weapons. the law is yet to be tested, but after newtown,
? campbell's soups give you nutrition, energy, and can help you keep a healthy weight. campbell's. it's amazing what soup can do. constipated? yeah. mm. some laxatives like dulcolax can cause cramps. but phillips' caplets don't. they have magnesium. for effective relief of occasional constipation. thanks. [ phillips' lady ] live the regular life. phillips'. ♪ heather: it is a race against the clock as millions of americans try to make it home just in time for that christmas dinner. but mother nature, yeah, certainly not cooperating in some areas as a wintry mix of snow, rain and sleet blankets much of the country. travelers at the nation's airports keeping their eyes glued for delays on the arrival and departure boards. elizabeth prann is there as well live at the busiest airport in the world, as far as, atlanta's hartfield jackson international airport. how you doing? how's it look out there? >> reporter: oh, hi, heather, good to see you. merry christmas. well, it's quite a busy day today, so the airport is certainly living up to its name. a lot of people experiencing some serious
. i love this city. i love the diversity of it. i love work walking. i love the energy. but at the end of the day -- >> california cool. >> california is home. >> what about chicago, though, which must hold a special place in your heart right now, because that is where your son is working following in dad's footsteps. and you guys did the coolest thing co-anchoring the news together. >> the anchoring thing is very funny because he just got married. and he and his wife invited us to come from thanksgiving. i said great. i said you're not working thanksgiving. well, actually i am working. i said oh, man. i said, well, i know sometimes in the news room people want thanksgiving off. if your co-anchor wants off i'm happy to fill in he goes really? i said yeah. i was half joking. ultimately his co-anchor was work. but they needed him to do the noon news and he didn't have a co-anchor. they said do you want to do it? i'm like really? so i'm like yeah, yeah, i'm in. so we did. and i know he's dish watch him all the time because i have a sling box. i can watch him. i know he's really good. but
to the bathrooms which is a good thing. but it can be very cold, and it is a lot of fun. such great energy. people come from all over the world. >> meantime, i'm carl quintanilla along with erica hill. lester has the morning off. >>> coming up this morning, we'll look at 25 years of "weekend today." >> we celebrated that silver anniversary this year. we'll share the big stories from that quarter century and hear from some of the people you've shared your weekends with over that time. >>> plus, ever wonder what happens to those christmas presents that you take back to the store? most aren't just put back on the shelf. we're going to show you one place where holiday returns are big business. >>> plus, a little later, love and romance on ice. we're going to take you to the iconic new york location just outside our studios where many men pop the question. that may look familiar to you. >> kind of gives it away. >> a little bit. >>> and we'll begin this half-hour, though, with a love story 25 years in the making. it all started when a sixth grade boy wrote a letter to a classmate who was then the apple
consequence. she's apparently to be head of a energy company that wants favors from epa or princeton. it's more important. we got legal proceedings to stop this massive economic dislocation. hopefully these candid discussions in the name of a false identity will shed light on that case. >> kelly: chris, we thank you for joining us and discussing this case that you're now pursuing. >> thank you. >> eric: coming up, the two things you'll need to know for new year's. great easy cocktails and a hangover cure you can find in the fridge. >> kelly: let's check in with gregg jarrett for what's coming up at the top of the hour. >> it's not my fridge. president obama set to meet today with house and senate leadership to make one more attempt to avoid going over the cliff. one prominent senator says hey, this meeting feels more like optics than anything real. are we skeptical? we'll have a fair and balanced debate. are dozens of law schools guilty of legal ethics violations? not mine. legal panel is here to weigh in on that in "america's newsroom" [ malennouncer ] it's tt time of year again. time f
's accommodative. energy prices and dependent reducing. look-term we get to the right place. but we've got to get a credible solution that has integrity. the more integrity the solution has, the more it addresses the long-term issues. the more cash will move out of investor portfolios and into markets. >> because looking at across this, as you say, valley, and abroad, there are people like mark fauber that think that assets will be marked down 50% based on what we already owe in terms of commitments to be made and entitlements in this country. so that what we've seen in other parts of the world is already going to happen here, that we can't really change our future. so you could make a -- you could make a decision as a wealth manage her to get defensive, not based on the fiscal cliff but based on the fiscal abyss. >> you could. for individuals, though, you asked the question earlier, andrew, what can you do? it's almost impossible for individual investors to market and be successful. so what do you do in an environment like this? every individual ought to have a plan. they ought to have a place t
in chairing the energy and water subcommittee, which is the committee that handles appropriations for the army corps of engineers, is how really difficult it is to get projects started, funded and constructed. and so i am one, particularly in view of storms, earthquakes, floods, damages, that you also need to do the mitigation because once it happens once, there's a heavy likelihood that it could happen again. so i rise in opposition to this amendment. the provision that the senator from oklahoma proposes would essentially take a project that's authorized, that has gone to the corps for study -- i beg your pardon? the presiding officer: the senator's time has expired. mrs. feinstein: may i ask for two minutes additional time, please. the presiding officer: is there objection? without objection. mrs. feinstein: thank you very much. would essentially take a corps project that has been authorized and the study is being done. once the study is concluded, t the -- and it is cost-effective, the corps proceeds to construction. with respect to mitigation, what this amendment does is, as i understand i
politics and legislation. it is not in our genes to put a whole bunch of energy in getting the republican party. we've not learned how to do that yet, i don't think. i like being a democrat for that reason. >> one of the things we hear from long-term members or members who are leaving is the congeniality here has changed. what is your view? >> person-to-person, you know what our elevators are like here. the public probably doesn't but we get squished and it is fun. there's humor and there is a lot of banter and people don't dislike each other, period. but you get off that elevator and it changes. when i first got here, people were -- the thing that surprised me was how polite, how respectful everybody was to everybody no matter what party you were, no matter what the issue was. it was very respectful. so you could carry on real conversations that over the years it has gotten -- it is just not. that's been a huge disappointment. >> our research shows that you are spoken on the floor, given 400-plus speeches. >> almost 450. >> in the house of representatives, why do you use that platform an
: this follow-up -- if you are poor, you'd have to spend a lot of energy to get enough to beat. john, connecticut. good morning. caller: good morning. i was calling to mention low- quality food and the cost of health care, but you covered well. do you think it would be more beneficial if they start doing a local farming program where they could start growing vegetables? maybe have some land with tiles and chickens, and local people could work on the farming areas and return the food to the communities as opposed to being so reliant on high-salt diets, the foods we would coin as having a long shelf life, leaving it on the shelf for six months without going bad? has the government been able to look into those programs, considering the finances involved in the program as a whole? host: thank you. a related topic -- the availability of this fresh produce is a big distraction for many. guest: there are some programs that speak directly to the point, one our farms-to-school programs, directed to help know where food is coming from and getting fresher food into the schools. in addition, we
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